In order to stay warm, divers often wear some sort of thermal protection, like





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In order to stay warm, divers often wear some sort of thermal protection, like a “wetsuit”. Often this is a neoprene “foamed” material, which traps gas bubbles as the insulating material. For this problem, assume:1) What is the thermal resistance of the suit? Rsuit =2) What is the heat capacity of the diver?Cdiver =3) What is the total amount of heat flow needed to change the diver’s temperature from 37°C to 35°C?Q =4) Estimate how long (in minutes) the diver can stay in the water (before feeling the effects of hypothermia).t =5) What would the time be if the suit were 8-mm thick instead?t =6) 1 calorie is the energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celcius, i.e., the specific heat of water is 1 calorie/g-°C. How many joules is 1 calorie?1 cal =7) A food Calorie (note the capitalization!) is defined as 1000 ‘physics’ calories: 1 Cal = 1 kcal (kilocalorie). How many Calories would our diver have to consume (assuming they all went to heating him) in order to make up for the thermal energy lost in cooling from 37°C to 35°C? (This assumes that he leaves the cold water, or that he consumes this many Calories every t minutes, where t is the time calculated above.)n =



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